CAST10 Archives

September 2012

CAST10@LISTSERV.UMD.EDU

Options: Use Proportional Font
Show Text Part by Default
Condense Mail Headers

Message: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]
Topic: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]
Author: [<< First] [< Prev] [Next >] [Last >>]

Print Reply
Mime-Version:
1.0
Sender:
"Chemical Engineers in Computing and Systems Technology, AIChE" <[log in to unmask]>
Subject:
From:
"Martha A. Grover" <[log in to unmask]>
Date:
Wed, 5 Sep 2012 14:39:40 -0400
Content-Type:
multipart/mixed; boundary="AM8Hc4iY9FOahw85AA731IhGl18iZ-SMnRV)pDHHAkRkxKP.xGcv.MQW)9+z)6QbYOs?A7"
Content-Transfer-Encoding:
7bit
Reply-To:
"Martha A. Grover" <[log in to unmask]>
Parts/Attachments:
WebCAST seminar on “Chemical Product Design: What is it? Why is it
Important? How is it done?”
 
by Kevin Joback and Michael Hill
 
Date: September 20, 2012, 2-4 pm (Eastern time)
 
Dial-in from the comfort of your office to hear the presentation

Deadline to Register: September 14, 2012 (details at
http://www.castdiv.org/WebCAST.htm)
 
Title: Chemical Product Design: What is it? Why is it Important? How is it done?

Abstract:

Chemical products such as fuels, coatings, lubricants and cosmetics must be
designed to meet specific customer, environmental, safety and regulatory
constraints. Designing such products is a combinatorial problem that can
involve searching through thousands of candidate molecular structures and
mixture formulations. In years past, this search was conducted primarily
experimentally, a costly and time-consuming process. Today, with a global
marketplace demanding an ever-greater rate of product innovation, new
approaches to chemical product design are needed. This course will discuss
what chemical product design is, explain why it is important for chemical
engineers to understand it, and present approaches and examples of how
chemical product design is done.

Michael Hill Biography:

Michael Hill is Lecturer in Chemical Engineering Design at Columbia
University in New York City.  He obtained his BS and MS degrees in Chemical
Engineering from Columbia University, and subsequently joined Unilever
Research in Edgewater, NJ in 1983.  Michael remained with Unilever for 22
years, leading R&D departments in various product categories, most notably
Skin Care and Cleansing.  Michael also spent 3 years in the Unilever
Research Port Sunlight Laboratory in the U.K.  He left Unilever in early
2005, and has been teaching Chemical Product and Process Design at Columbia
University ever since. In addition to writing numerous internal Unilever
Research documents, Michael has authored several papers and book chapters on
various aspects of chemical product and process design.  He is Chair of
AIChE’s Process Development Division, and has been a Fellow of AIChE since 2008.

Kevin Joback Biography:

Kevin G. Joback is president of Molecular Knowledge Systems. For more than
25 years Kevin has worked in the areas of physical property estimation and
chemical product design. He has developed a number of group contribution
estimation techniques now widely used in industry. He has designed numerous
chemical products including environmentally friendly cleaning and separation
solvents, new lubricants, enhanced thermal storage materials, improved jet
and rocket fuels, and non-hazardous aircraft deicing fluids. Kevin holds a
bachelor’s degree from Stevens Institute of Technology and a Masters and PhD
from MIT, all in chemical engineering.



ATOM RSS1 RSS2